Womoz: May Update

Delphine

1

Time for a (long overdue) overview of what has been happening in the Women & Mozilla project since our last update.

Mainly, we have been very busy with accomplishing the tasks from our 2010 WoMoz Roadmap, just as we had planned and announced. Here are some more details concerning this long-term task, as well as our other activities:

  • 2010 Roadmap
    • What has been done
    • We have successfully accomplished the first steps of our Roadmap and followed our predetermined milestones accordingly. Only the survey is taking us longer to create than we expected (especially concerning the elaboration of the survey questions), while some future tasks have been started in advance, such as working on creating a Newcomers Team and mentorship program.
      So what does this mean concretely?
      We have mainly worked internally, contacting leaders throughout the various – and numerous – Mozilla communities in order to find out who and where the Mozilla women contributors are. This first phase permits us now to have a general and more accurate idea of who these women are, what they work in, how long they have been contributing, as well as the proportion of women and men in these teams (list to be published soon).
      We know of course that it is difficult to find *all* the contributors, however this will help us gain a much better overview and perspective than we had before.
      Concerning the Newcomers Team and mentorship program, we are currently brainstorming on ways to integrate this idea within the general Mozilla project. You may find notes concerning these ideas and this projects on our Meeting Notes page here: https://wiki.mozilla.org/WoMoz/StatusMeetings

    • What still needs to be done
    • As mentioned above, we still need to finish elaborating the internal survey questions. This survey will be distributed amongst the women contributors in Mozilla that we have contacted and that have contacted us as well. We will also elaborate a specific survey for the Mozilla women employees.
      The main goal of this survey is to have an overview of the profile of the women working and contributing in Mozilla, as well as their activities and perceptions in the institution.
      The purpose of the survey will be to detect areas of improvement related to gender issues in Mozilla and FLOSS communities for further actions and to give more visibility to women’s work.
      More info and notes about the survey can be found here.

  • WoMoz side-tasks
  • As you can notice, our blog has a new theme now. It still has some minor issues and bugs to fix, however the theme is practically ready to rock & roll! A big and special thanks to BĆ©atrice Kreng and Julia Buchner for having dedicated so much of their time on this. šŸ™‚
    Also, we are currently working on a fun Fortune package that we would like to integrate into Linux distributions. It will basically be like the Wanda Fortune Fish that already exists on Ubuntu for example, with quotations from famous women.
    A more detailed list of our side-tasks can be found here.

  • What we still need help with
  • The two main areas were we still need help and volunteers with are: writing articles on the blog and making videos. If you are interested in helping out, please don’t hesitate to contact us or leave a comment below.

  • Update on the number of community members & contributors
    • Mailing List -> 80 people
    • Wiki Members -> 28 registered users
    • IRC -> around 15 online (during European Time Zone)
    • Facebook WoMoz Fan Page -> 140 fans

As always, feel free to join us for our meetings if you’re interested! They’re open to *all* and any suggestions for the project are welcome.

Barbie, computer engineer

Nastassia

5

Barbie has had 124 careers since 1959: she was a princess, a rock star, an Olympic champion, an air hostess and an astronaut. Toy company Mattel has launched a contest to determine their next Barbie doll’s occupation and she has finally received her 125th job: she will be a computer engineer.

According to the director of Barbie marketing for Mattel, a lot of female engineers and other women in the tech industry voted for this Computer Engineer career for Barbie.

Mattel explains that “To create an authentic look, BarbieĀ® designers worked closely with the Society of Women Engineers and the National Academy of Engineering to develop the wardrobe and accessories for Computer Engineer BarbieĀ®. Wearing a binary code patterned tee and equipped with all the latest gadgets including a smart phone, Bluetooth headset, and laptop travel bag, Computer Engineer BarbieĀ® is geek chic.”

Barbie’s new career is not just an answer to the demand of the popular vote, itā€™s also a way to encourage young girls to aspire to engineering or technology careers.

Sources:

http://www.zdnet.fr/blogs/l-esprit-libre/la-poupee-barbie-sera-informaticienne-et-utilise-linux-39713313.htm

http://www.chipchick.com/2010/02/computer-engineer-barbie.html

In India, computer sciences and women aren’t incompatible. However, management and women are.

Nastassia

0

Summary of an article written by Mathilde Cristiani

Indian girls are massively interested in computer sciences and engineering jobs1. The number of girl teenagers following theses studies has increased by 125% in 2008. They are attracted by information and communication technologies related to environment or electric resources, but not so much by nuclear or aerospace industries. 71% women are careerist, and the same percentage have chosen this stream because of the attractive salaries.

And what about parity? It’s interesting to notice that there are different perceptions of the situation between male and female workers: 55% men think that women and men are equal in the company. But what do women think about that? Only 26% share the same opinion. So, who tells the truth? We can see that in fact only 30% women are involved in management activities in their companies.

1 All the statistics are from the Chamber of commerce and industry of India

WoMoz Update: 2010/03/03

Delphine

0

It’s been a while since the last WoMoz update. FOSDEM has been an update in itself thanks to the WoMoz side-sessions we have led there. Here’s what’s happened in the WoMoz project since then:

  • WoMoz IRC Meetings are now held twice a month, at 17:00 UTC (9am PST). More info here
  • We’ve finished establishing our WoMoz 2010 Roadmap during the last meeting: Roadmap and Last Meeting Notes
  • Currently working on the first tasks of the 2010 WoMoz Roadmap: contacting
    community leaders
  • Continuing the organization of specific teams within Womoz: survey team, webdesign team, l10n team, etc.
  • Working on creating a WoMoz Planet: aggregating WoMoz community blog posts on the WoMoz Blog
  • The Webdesign team is still working on rebuilding the WoMoz Website: integrating the wiki, blog and video site
  • Really cool video by Lukas Blakk about Women in Open Source during FOSDEM 2010 has been integrated in the WoMoz Video Website here: http://womoz.mirocommunity.org/video/153/fosdem-2010-video-women-in-ope

Update on WoMoz Participants (data as of March 3rd, 2010):

  • Wiki: 26 users (so people editing the wiki and working directly and regularly on the project’s evolution)
  • IRC: generally around 20 online in the European Time Zone

Womoz at FOSDEM 2010

admin

3

Womoz workgroup session

Last week-end I went to the ULB of Bruxelles for the 10th edition of FOSDEM (Free and Open Source Software Developers European Meeting). For this event which grouped more than 200 lectures, Women & Mozilla was present with the many members from the Mozilla community. In the WoMoz program, 2 workgroup sessions Saturday and Sunday morning, with a lightning talk on Sunday afternoon. During these 2 days, we were able to meet WoMoz contributors as well as members from other floss projects.

The workgroup sessions has helped us to establish a 2010 roadmap for the project. We agreed that Womoz’s action should firstly be divided into two categories:

  • internal actions: correspond to a diagnosis and analysis of the communities, as well as an improvement of the visibility of women contributors in Mozilla
  • external actions: it will be a question of creating tools in order to modify the vision that the “general public” has of FLOSS and Mozilla projects.

You can find the complete notes from these sessions and the 2010 Roadmap on the wiki: http://www.womoz.org/wiki/doku.php?id=fosdem2010_daily_agenda

During 15 min on Sunday evening, Delphine LebƩdel and Alix Cazenave spoke in the Mozilla DevRoom about the project:

Photo credit: Flore Allemandou